News Stories

People vs Cruz
Attempted Murder
2010

Dismissed Furthermore of Justice
422 pl charges

Private investigator, Louis P. Galindez


 People vs Cruz
Attempted Murder
2009


Charges Dismissed
286pc, 261pc, 207pc, 236pc

Private investigator, Louis P. Galindez


Thompson Not Guilty
Merced Sun Star - Modesto Bee - Fresno Bee
July 4, 2008

Merced county Sheriff's longest running cold case homicide came to spot light with the arrest of Mr. Thompson in 2005, Two Jury trails and 21 years after the murders of two young girls one 12 and 15 years of age - Thompson placed his hands over his face and wept on Thursday as a court clerk read the verdict in his second trail: Not guilty on two counts of first - degree murder. Less than and hour later, he walked out of the side exit of the Merced County jail, his home for the past two years, and in to the embrace of his wife.

Attorney Randy E. Thomas
Private investigator, Louis P. Galindez
Modesto Bee - KCRA


Major charges dropped
Abbey won't face trail on
manslaughter, murder

A Stanislaus county judge dropped second-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter charges Monday 2011 against former sheriff's detective Abbey who had been charged in the off-duty shooting death of a Modesto woman. this case should have never been filed by the district attorney's office, this was a clear case of self defense, the judge ruled Abbey acted in self-defense. I assisted in the case early on and interviewed (4) of the (5) eye witnesses who were there prior and during the shooting on Sept. 31, 2010.


Plea deal in farm worker death
The Stockton Record - The Modesto Beee - KCRA channel 3 - AP news March 09, 2011

Two California farm superisors charged in the 2008 heat-related death of a pregnant teen farmworker reached a plea deal Wednesday and were sentenced to community service and probation, angering adocates who had called for prison. San Joaquin County case
Attorney, Randy E. Thomas
Private investigator, Louis P. Galindez
Tracy Press, the Stockton Record


WARD REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE
and FORECLOSURE SERVICES

Real estate fraud case Case dismissed in court on march 30, 2011 Case: the grand jury of the county of san Joaquin, state of California, Indictment of our client and two other defendants, on 51 counts and enhancements for tax code violations, grand theft, securites violations, elder abuse, the list goes on. Plus the taking of some 5,000,000 million dollars. Our team when to work and as you can see the results (ALL CHARGES DISMISSED)

Private investigator Louis P. Galindez


 

Comprehensive

Background Check


  • Identity of Person & Age Verification
  • Current & Historical Addresses
  • Phones, Emails, Bankruptcies, Judgements
  • Liens, Assets, Real Property, Eviction Records
  • Nationwide Criminal Record Search
  • Nationwide Wants & Warrants Search & Local Checks
  • Nationwide Sex & Violent Offender Search
  • National Sex Offender Registry
  • Concealed Weapons Permit
  • UCC Filings, Watercraft, Hunting/Fishing Permits
  • FAA Aircraft, FAA Pilots
  • Business Reports
  • Credit Reports
  • Education Verification
  • Reference Check=Inquiry with References
  • Driving Record-Moving Violations Report

& More


(This will require a signed release from the applicant & your company.) You will receive a written report: This is for employers who are hiring technical & trade specific positions, middle managers, other mid-level positions, public agencies, dispatching & law enforcement positions, and key executives and/or partners.

Pre-Employment Screening & Background Investigations

Valley Investigative Professionals is licensed and insured in the state of California, and has been conducting background investigations for private, businesses, public agencies, and corporations. We have the resources to obtain the information you need nationwide. Mr. Louis P. Galindez, C.P.S.B.I., C.I.T.I., is a certified Pre-employment Screening & Background Investigation Specialist, a certified Identity Theft Investigator, and a retired Law Enforcement Officer. Mr. Galindez will personally conduct each background check and provide you with a written report at the completion of all inquiries. We have access to investigative data bases and other sources which are not available to the public sector. Your personal and business related interest require our agency to obtain and provide the most credible and accurate information available. We do test our proprietary databases and human resources for accuracy and dependability.

Why conduct a comprehensive background check?

Hiring highly qualified people is very crucial to every employer. In this turbulent business environment, you can not afford not to hire right. There is one consistent theme, an old adage, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." When you, the employer, fail to to exercise due diligence in hiring and just one bad hire slips through, the results can be disastrous. Are you hiring an employee who will be handling sensitive information and money? Our service is designed for the client who wants to manage risk through, fraud detection, prevention, and risk evaluation. Conducting a comprehensive background check will uncover problems, reduce legal & employment problems, discover fraudulent claims, and result in better hires.

World wide investigative background checks?

Before conducting business with any individual or business nation wide or overseas, you should trust but always verify! Our reach in background checks is in over 200 hundred counties. We can provide you with Civil & Criminal records, credit checks and finance information about the person or business that you might be dealing with.

The Cost of Negligent Hiring!

The impact to the company’s Bottom Line can be critical to its survival.

  • 30% of businesses fail each year due to employee theft and dishonesty
  • Negligent hiring is an increasingly popular target for legal action
  • Awards in negligent hiring and retention cases average over one million dollars
  • Fraud and abuse cost U.S. organizations $400 billion annually


Mitigating the Cost of Negligent Hiring! Avoid attorney fees.

  • Avoid attorney fees
  • Minimize workmen’s compensation claims
  • Recruit and maintain productive employees
  • Protect your company’s assets and reputation
  • California Background Checks require special attention
  • The name, address, and phone number of the company that supplied the credit report or background information
  • A statement that the company that supplied the information didn’t make the decision to take the adverse action and can’t give you any specific reasons for it and;
  • A notice of your right to dispute the accuracy or completeness of any information in your report and to get an additional free report from the company that supplied the credit or other background information, if you ask for it within 60 days.

Employment Background Checks and Credit Reports


You’ve applied for a job, you sent a letter, made a phone call, submitted your resume. Perhaps you’ve had an interview? Did you know that when you apply for a job, an employer may ask your permission to do a background check before hiring you? Not only do credit reporting companies provide information to employers, but they also sell it to creditors, insurers and other businesses that, in turn, use it to evaluate your applications for credit, insurance, or renting a place to live.

Key Employment Provisions

The big picture is this: An employer must get your permission before asking for a report about you from a credit reporting company or any other company that provides background information. If you don’t give your okay, your application for employment may not get a second look, that’s up to you! But if you don’t get the job because of information on your report, the employer has some legal obligations: First, the employer must show you the report; second, the employer must tell you how to get your own copy. The report is free if you ask for it within 60 days of learning the bad news.


Here are more details about these provisions:

Depending on the employer and the job, that background information might include your employment history, your driving record, criminal records, and your credit report. Your credit report has information about where you live, how you pay your bills, and whether you have filed for bankruptcy. Credit reporting companies and other businesses that provide background information sell your file to employers that, in turn, use it to evaluate your applications for employment. Employers also are allowed to use these reports to consider you for retention, promotion or reassignment.


Notice and Authorization.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), a law that protects the privacy and accuracy of the information in your credit report. The FCRA spells out your rights as a job applicant and an employer’s responsibilities when using credit reports and other background information to assess your application. The law also enables you to get a free copy of your credit report by requiring each of the three national credit reporting companies — TransUnion, Equifax and Experian — to provide it to you every 12 months if you ask. That means if you stagger your requests to each of the companies, you can get a free copy of your credit report every four months.


Pre-Adverse Action Procedures.


Before an employer can ask for reports about you from any companies that provide them, it must tell you that it might use the information to make a decision. This notice is separate from other documents you get — like an application. An employer may not get a report about you for employment purposes without getting your permission or authorization first, usually in writing.

If an employer might use information from a credit or other background report to take an “adverse action” — say, to deny your application for employment or a promotion, to terminate your employment or to reassign you — they must give you a copy of the report and a document called 'A Summary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act' before taking the adverse action. Read your report and contact the company that issued it, if you find inaccurate or incomplete information.

You also can explain any inaccurate or incomplete information to an employer, but that won’t fix errors in your report. To do that, you have to contact the company that issued the report and dispute the information. If an investigation reveals that a correction is warranted, the credit reporting company or other company providing background information must send an updated report to the employer, if you ask them to. Even if the information is not corrected in time to benefit you with that particular employer, it’s a good idea to dispute inaccurate information so it can be corrected before your next job interview or assignment comes along.


Adverse Action Procedures.


If an employer takes an adverse action against you based on information in a report, it must tell you — orally, in writing, or electronically. The notice to you must include:

If a company provides an employer with a report that has negative information about you gathered from public records — for example: tax liens, outstanding judgments, or criminal convictions — that company either has to tell you that it provided the information to the employer or it has to take special steps to make sure the information is accurate.

If you get a notice that a company has provided negative public record information to an employer, you may have a chance to correct or clarify it, which, in turn, may help you get or keep a job.


Your call is strictly confidential!

(209) 577-0491

If employers don’t comply with the FCRA, there are legal consequences. Whether they fail to get an applicant’s okay before getting a copy of their credit or other background report, fail to provide the appropriate disclosures in a timely way, or fail to provide adverse action notices to unsuccessful job applicants. If you think an employer has violated the FCRA, report it to the FTC because the law allows the FTC, other federal agencies and states to sue employers who don’t comply with the law’s provisions. The FCRA also allows people to sue employers in state or federal court for certain violations.

The FTC works to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them.

If you get a notice that a company has provided negative public record information to an employer, you may have a chance to correct or clarify it, which, in turn, may help you get or keep a job.

To file a complaint or get free information on consumer issues,
call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261.